Women Embracing Modest Fashion For It’s Glamour and Fun

 

 

There are two articles published this week that focused on the importance of modest fashion glamour in the larger fashion industry. Below, there are three main points of those two articles. We also posted a few main paragraphs of those articles. Feel free to read summary and full version of those stories. Happy reading.

  • It seems that the modest fashion embraces clavicles over cleavages and the floor-length hemline over hike-high short dresses.
  • Fashion is a fashion designer’s perception of where we are culturally and socially. Perhaps, we are not in the time and era where super-sexy clothes are super cool. “Designers and creators must be mindful of respecting women’s choices across different faith, age groups, sizes and cultures,” said Swapna Anumolu designer for Mishru label.
  • Gucci, Max Mara, Molly Goddard, Versace, Calvin Kelin, Marc Jacob and Chanel have all sent models in “Muslimish headpieces down the runway.

 

A part of daily lives

Is modest dressing having a major moment in fashion – Hindustan Times

Modest fashion is not just a trend; it is an essential part of our daily lives and designer Arpita Mehta, Indian designer, believes that it is a way of dressing that people adhere to every now and then. “We definitely see it a lot in India but internationally it has become quite a sight for fashion. From high neck collared shirts, to full sleeved denim jackets, to floor length maxi’s, modest fashion has taken a turn today, and is being interspersed into our everyday clothing wardrobe,” says Arpita.

Today, one’s witnessing long hemlines, relaxed trousers, flowy dresses and longer sleeve lengths on both international and Indian runways as well as high street fashion.

Designer Swapna Anumolu of label Mishru believes that modest fashion can be enjoyed by everyone in a way that they feel comfortable and confident in. “It is a way to cater to women in terms of their fashion and lifestyle choices. In our country like ours, with multicultural identities and even the global sphere shifting to accepting and celebrating all communities, respect for people’s personal choices is key. Designers and creators must be mindful of respecting women’s choices across different faiths, age groups, sizes and cultures,” says Swapna.

 

Major Brands Want Piece of the Cake

Catwalk cover-up: how the west is falling for modest fashion – The Guardian

Headscarves and hijabs have also been de rigueur at the shows. Gucci, Max Mara, Molly Goddard, Versace, Calvin Klein, Marc Jacobs and Chanel have all sent models in “Muslim-ish” headpieces down the runway. The argument that the industry is offensively fetishising religious wear, turning something deeply meaningful into a throwaway trend, has been made several times. On the other hand, by seeming to be more inclusive, is this progress?

Author and influencer Yassmin Abdel-Magied is circumspect: “I think modest being fashionable right now isn’t really about modesty: it’s about trends. In the same way skin was fashionable in the 90s, in times it’ll be unfashionable again. [But] there is something beautiful about the way cultures with modest traditions style themselves, so there is rich, untapped stimulus for fashion houses.”